• Creator
    Topic
  • #2039200

    Inno
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Can anyone explain the purpose of the cut-outs to the sides of the plane body, as shown in the photos?

    Thanks.

  • Author
    Replies
  • Joshua Farnsworth
    Keymaster
    Post count: 75

    Very strange. At first I thought it was purely decorative, but after seeing the other unmatching side I’m thinking the person who did that was very, very drunk. This must be a more modern “modification” because the handle looks like a modern homemade handle. Any brand name on this? If not, then it’s probably one of the bronze castings made from an antique Stanley plane. I have a router plane like that…poor casting, but still fun.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
  • Inno
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Thanks for your reply Joshua. It’s a Bailey No. 5 plane. The cut-outs show signs of being done on purpose with a saw, then smoothed out.

    Yes, the rear handle is a hand-made replacement.

    The plane is fully functional as is, but ugly for sure. It’s an early Bailey with two patent dates. Appears to be a Type 10 from 1907-09 from what I read online.

  • Joshua Farnsworth
    Keymaster
    Post count: 75

    Is the bronze color just the lighting or the actual color of the metal?

  • Inno
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    It’s steel not bronze. Must be an artifact of the phone camera.

  • Mike in TN
    Participant
    Post count: 295

    I have seen some planes with similar damage from mishandling. My guess is that it is a badly abused plane and the previous owners have tried to smooth the edges just to make them kinder to the hand. If it continues to work then great. It definitely is a conversation piece.

  • Red5hft
    Participant
    Post count: 25

    Have one like this

    I have one or two with a cheek cut down like yours. I believe this is the result of a dropped plane where the cast iron cheek broke away. The owner may have tried to clean it up and smooth it out leaving file marks. I acquired mine for salvage parts. How the cheeks extend from the body make them a natural outlet for the shock energy outlet when a plane is dropped. The brittle cast iron can then fractures along an arc.

    “Whether you think you can, or you can’t, you’re right.”
    -Henry Ford.

  • Red5hft
    Participant
    Post count: 25

    Broken Cheek Image

    Here is an image of one of the salvage planes I have with a broken cheek as described earlier.

    “Whether you think you can, or you can’t, you’re right.”
    -Henry Ford.

  • Inno
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Thanks to you all for your input! I plan to list it on eBay “for parts or restoration”.

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