Basic Hammer Veneering

Basic Hammer Veneering 2015-06-21T22:10:10+00:00
  • Author
    Replies
  • Bilbo
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Veneering

    Hill Bill. Its amazing how so many woodworkers look down condescendingly on veneering. I believe it to be one of the very fine arts of cabinetmaking. I have been doing marquetry and veneering in the 18th European style for a few years now and have recently built my first “Chevalet de Marqueterie” and am loving the control that I now have. Hopefully there will be more woodworkers out there who wish to play with tiny bits of wonderful woods, hide glue, veneer hammers and immense satisfaction

  • Nick
    Participant
    Post count: 6

    Veneering

    Hi Bill,

    I love veneering, I’ve  only carried it out on pieces that I’m renovating, patching/infilling etc.

    But its really interesting, and when you get it right, very rewarding too. I must say I find modern glues easier than hot hide glue, but I’m determined to persevere!

    Really puts in perspective what the guys in years gone by could do!

    Nick

     

  • jeffh
    Participant
    Post count: 6

    Bill, nice video.  Never done this, so it is interesting to me that you put glue on the face of the veneer.

     

    Jeff

  • Bill
    Participant
    Post count: 72

    Putting glue on the face of the veneer does two things: provide a little lubrication for the hammer and equalize the moisture on both sides of the veneer.

    I’m going to do a video on how to pre-flatten veneer before use soon so stay tuned.

  • Vitaly M.
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    thanks

     

  • Mike in TN
    Participant
    Post count: 253

    While I believe that quality work with veneers is a high art form, I believe that the primary reasons that a lot of woodworkers don’t have high respect for the finished product is because we have seen so many mass produced pieces that seem to be prone to deterioration and that some of the overall styles of furniture that generally feature veneers and marquetry are not as popular as they once were. I understand that using veneers allows for the use of woods (species and figure) that generally are not practical for solid construction and allows for creative choices not otherwise possible or practical. I enjoy looking at it and admiring the workmanship and art of it but I don’t think I want to live everyday with it. The exception might be marquetry and inlays inserted into solid furniture.

    Having said that, one of most wonderful aspects of woodworking is that there are so many different products, skills and traditions involved and all are worthy of preservation and study. Thank you for creating sharing with us.

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