Glue 2015-10-24T21:29:17+00:00
  • Creator
    Topic
  • #2027541

    James Wright
    Participant
    Post count: 108

    I was wondering what your go to glue is. I know there is a lot of preference, but I would love to here reasons for you like what you use.

    Also, what would you use on a sloppy joint. I was told to use an expanding glue like Gorilla Glue if there is a bit of a void but I am not hot on the idea. what are your thoughts?

  • Author
    Replies
  • Mike in TN
    Participant
    Post count: 254

    I like PVA glues for most things. They do the job and I don’t tend to worry about taking the work apart since I assume my work will not end up as ancient heirlooms. This speaks to the type of work I do as much as the glues themselves. If I did a lot of musical instruments, historical restorations and high end reproductions I’m sure hide glue would be involved. I also use CA and epoxies in some of my tool restoration work and jig and fixture and for wood “flaw” repair.

  • Bill
    Participant
    Post count: 72

    I use hot hide glue and Old Brown Glue (liquid/cold hide glue) almost exclusively. I do this, as Mike said above, because it fits the work I do. I tend to do a lot of period pieces, restorations, etc. I will *hopefully* be getting into some instrument building, too.

    There’s three things I really like about HHG and OBG
    1. It can easily be undone. If I goof, hot water and heat will take the joint apart.
    2. It’s traditional and period accurate.
    3. I love to watch my dogs go nuts eating it (relax all you ASPCAers – I don’t feed them a diet of HHG…they just get the “drippings”).

    Patrick Edwards at Antique Refinishers/ASFM is the maker of OBG so I try to buy my hide glue and OBG direct from him. Patrick, Patrice (his business partner), and Kristen (his wife and business partner) bend over backwards to help anyone who calls and bothers them with idiotic questions about OBG and veneering, so I like to give my business direct to him so he can make more $$ on it than if I bought it through a retailer like Highland. If you’ve never tried it, you should. It’s the easiest way to get into hide glue – no pot needed. Just google them and watch some of their videos.

    That said, I do, on occasion, use Titebond and Epoxy when required.

  • BFgeronimo
    Participant
    Post count: 38

    Hide glue seems to be the choice of “purists”. Makes sense. Myself, I have found Titebond to be pretty perfect. I use III for glue-only applications like laminating two boards together or edge joining. I or II is good in conjunction with joinery like a dovetail or tenon and mortise. Of course, III would be good for any of those as well, I just have different bottles and try to be economical about which I am using

    OWOF

  • Clamelot
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    For me PVA is the best. For most things. I do a lot of acoustic guitars and cigar box guitars and it serves me very well. Of course the CA glue also have a place my shop;

  • southof30guy
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Is there a dovetail you can apply without using glue? So if you wanted to take apart later it won’t be glues permanently?  Thank You

    • Mike in TN
      Participant
      Post count: 254

      A lot of folks use hide glue with the idea that they might have to take the joint apart. That is one of the advantages of hide glue. As for dovetails with no glue, I suppose you could pin them  to help hold them together and then drill the pin out. If you already know you will be disassembling the joint then maybe you should just use knockdown furniture hardware  or wedged joints instead.

      Have fun

    • Mike in TN
      Participant
      Post count: 254

      James,

      To answer your question on sloppy joints, I would repair the joint first so that it wouldn’t be loose before I would just try to correct it with gap filling glues, but I suspect that you would too.

      Have fun

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