Joinery planes, which one first?

//Joinery planes, which one first?
Joinery planes, which one first? 2015-07-09T20:25:51+00:00
  • Creator
    Topic
  • #2026609

    Daniel
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    Should I purchase a tongue and groove plane or a router plane first?

    I’m looking to make panels with a groove to fit quarter or eighth inch plywood inside of the groove. Currently I kreg jig the frame and nail the plywood to the back. I know I can do better than that after watching all the videos on this site.

    Any thoughts on tools to improve the quality of my work?

  • Author
    Replies
  • Bill
    Participant
    Post count: 72

    I wholeheartedly believe you should get a plough plane.  That will get you the ability to make floating panels.  Abandon the Kreg jig in favor of M&T joints for your frame construction.  Router planes certainly have their place, but it’s not in making raised or captured panel doors.

  • Seth Ruffin
    Participant
    Post count: 62

    For a router you can also always use Paul Seller’s poor boy router technique. It’s easy to find on YouTube.

    Seth

  • Daniel
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    Interesting video from Paul Sellers, I’ll try that technique for fun.

    I do plan to work on mortise and tenons instead of pocket holes for my projects but I won’t drop the kreg jig completely, it’s just so quick.

    So no Lie Nielsen plough planes available? I used Joshua’s link to ebay for Stanley 45 combination planes. Is close to $200 reasonable for a full working set of cutters and a good condition plane?

    I like the idea of having a versatile tool as I am a beginner so I’m drawn to the Stanley 45, I can acquire dedicated planes later. I mostly build little gifts for friends and family.

    So, wait for a Lie Neilsen version of a plough or combination plane or purchase a Stanley 45 on ebay?

  • Bill
    Participant
    Post count: 72

    I bought the Veritas.  It’s wonderfully made, works well, and at $150 or so it’s a good deal.

    • russwolf1960
      Participant
      Post count: 2

      When I bought a Stanley 45 about a year ago, $125 seemed like the going rate for a complete one. Also, if you’re looking on Ebay, there are other combination planes that you might want to watch for – Sargent, Craftsman (made by Sargent), Wards, Record…

  • Seth Ruffin
    Participant
    Post count: 62

    I’m hoping for the Veritas to be my next plane purchase. Hoping to just go ahead and spend the extra for the expansion piece and the tongue blades. Seems like the best compromise at the moment. Though I hope to eventually get some wooden plough planes but that may be much farther down the line.

  • Daniel
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    I looked around online today and read some articles on the Veritas small plow plane. I liked what I read, the extra cutters sound perfect for the hobby building that I like to do. And the price seems fair for a new tool. I’m looking for lifetime usage, can anyone vouch for that? Maybe not lifetime but I don’t want to buy another one is a few years.

    If I’m looking to make a hinge mortise for a small box or small decorative cabinet, should I pick up a small router plane? Or do you more experienced folk just use a chisel?

  • Germanjoiner
    Participant
    Post count: 5
  • Seth Ruffin
    Participant
    Post count: 62

    Thanks for the link Germanjointer. I have been considering how economical it is to build planes rather than purchase them. A plough plane was one I was considering building along with a fore or joiner plane. It’s good to know I’m not the only one who thinks this way and there is some extra information out there on how to build them.

    Seth

  • Daniel
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    My available woodworking time is limited and so is my skill level. Building a plane sounds like something I’ll attempt much further down the road. It’s good to know that building your own planes is feasible.

    I’m still checking the web for information on plow planes. I am glad I got nudged into the plow plane direction, it seems like a more versitle tool that I would get a lot more usage out of instead of just a tongue and groove plane.

    So my question from earlier:

    If I’m looking to make a hinge mortise for a small box or small decorative cabinet, should I pick up a small router plane? Or do you more experienced folk just use a chisel?

    Thanks!

    -Dan

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