Oils for Tools?

//Oils for Tools?
Oils for Tools? 2015-07-14T18:45:48+00:00
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    Topic
  • #2026687

    Seth Ruffin
    Participant
    Post count: 62

    So I use some PB Blaster that I have extra of from working on cars to clean of tools I get that have a lot of grime on them. It seems to really clean well, put a protective kind of coat over, and if I use it on joint seems not only to clean but lubricate as well. So PB Blaster is often my go to cleaner/cleaning oil.

    I have read that a lot of people use Jojoba oil or 3-in-1 or a couple other selections to protect their tools as well as help them work more smoothly. I’ve also read that some people use various things on the soles of their planes to ease use. So far for a lubricant only oil I’ve use white lithium grease spayed onto a towel then wiped onto the joint or nut I’m lubricating (again an extra item I have laying around from auto work).

    My question is: What do you use? Where do you use it? and is there a cheap easy place to buy it?

    Thanks in advance for help or suggestions.

    Seth

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    Replies
  • MetalworkerMike
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    ‘Old Timey’ tools didn’t have many moving parts, in general, so lubricating joints wasn’t a big issue, but for lubricating the soles of planes the standard was animal fat.  Sheep’s tallow was popular.  Whatever was available.  Goose grease, sperm oil, whatever depending on the situation.

    What I use to lube planes and saws, personally, is paraffin wax.

    M.Mike

    • Mike in TN
      Participant
      Post count: 253

      When I refurbish an old metal tool, and metal parts of wooden tools,  I normally use a drop of 3-in one on screw threads and bearing points. I will then give them a light coat of baby oil. They are my babies after all.  Actually, baby oil is a light mineral, is readily available, and relatively cheap. A wiping afterwards with a dry paper towel leaves enough oil to keep the rust away, keeps oil off of the work, and keeps the tool from being slippery in the hand.

      I use  paste wax on my wooden tools and paraffin  on all of the rubbing surfaces, soles, fences, etc. Canning wax or candles are cheap, convenient, and will last a long, long, time. I have one block of canning wax that I keep at the bench that I have used for two years now and will probably last me another four.

  • John
    Participant
    Post count: 10

    I’m a fan of furniture wax for wooden planes.  Maybe it’s the smell of the wax but the combination of the olfactory and physical senses creates a powerful memory for me.

  • Bilbo
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Hi,

    I use paraffin wax on the soles of my planes (both wooden and metal) and for everything else, I use olive oil. The reasons for olive oil as straightforward….. It is a completely natural product, incredibly cheap to use in the tiny quantities that I require, does not have much of an odour and best of all its great for my hands in winter. I simply put a few drops into the palm of one hand and briskly rub them together. then I run my hands all over the saw, chisel, plane etc and the items get a very fine oilcoat. This has worked extremely well for me for at least fifteen years. As far as machine beds go, I use old fashioned white floor polish, again with a very very thin coat. Good luck

  • Bill White
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    Wax and oil in my shop.

    Caning wax for the soles, paste wax for the bodies, and plain old oil for the moving parts.

    Make me a minimalist?  YEP!  I don’t want to keep exotic oils in a strong box ’cause they are so expensive.  :)

    Bill

  • Bilbo
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Hi Bill
    I am lucky that my wife is in the olive oil industry. Seriously though, the amount that I use is miniscule…a 100ml bottle lasts me about 6-8 months and this is used on all my carving chisels, mortise and paring chisels, all planes including about 30 moulding planes that are regularly used, spokeshaves, router planes, rulers and all my saws.

  • pmelchman
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    i use wax and camelia oil. nothing reduces the friction of a hand plane than camelia oil. I use wax when I need to do a quick hand planning….

  • Seth Ruffin
    Participant
    Post count: 62

    Thanks for all the suggestions and comments. I have been reading them as they come in. I love the idea of olive oil and the desire for simplicity in both application and use.

    I’m excited to hear more.

    Seth

  • Bilbo
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Hi Seth, one of the nicest things about using olive oil is that it is great for your hands!!

  • AndrewLeslie
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    To prevent rust on metal tools, I tend to use any food oil I have on hand; most commonly olive oil, and, lately, walnut oil. Haven’t done it long enough to see if there are any bad effects, but so far it seems to work well at preventing rust, and smelling good.

  • John
    Participant
    Post count: 10

    I tried canola oil on a saw I’d sanded to remove some rust. It was all I had on hand and I imagined it a good short term solution since I thought it would only be a short time before I resumed working on the saw. Life got in the way and it dried to a hard finish which then became a hard film after a few weeks. It’s not a good thing, it becomes gummy when you use the saw and is the very devil to remove. I hope hot vinegar will take it off so that’s my next chore.

  • Germanjoiner
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Hello !

    I Use Ballistol and Silbergleit.

    Silbergleit is very good and makes iron slippery without a rubber efect. If you use Silbergleit you have no problems with rust. I use every friday after work for my engines and planes.

    Home

    http://www.ebay.de/itm/like/121510425008?ul_noapp=true&chn=ps&lpid=106

  • HaroldSink
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Any tools I have with large metal surfaces that need to be cleaned are ones that I will spray WD-40 lightly, let soak 5 minutes, and wipe off wish a shop cloth.

    I use 3-in-1 oil on smaller surfaces, but instead of applying a drop or two onto the surface, I soak the tip of a cloth and apply evenly to the surface.

    When restoring old tools I find, I first soak the tool in a combination of vinegar and baking soda to remove rust.  Usually that will take no more than 30 minutes.  After soaking, I wipe off with a clean shop cloth.  My next step is to sand the surface smooth before soaking in a small tub of fine 100 wt oil (model train oil) since that is probably one of the most refined oils for anything.  After wiping it off it will look brand new and you won’t need to clean as often.

    If you prep wood before cutting by using linseed oil, you won’t have as much gumming up on saw teeth as you normally would.

  • Bill White
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    UHHHHH?  Vinegar and baking soda??  Won’t one neutralize the other.  Acid, base chemical, neutral solution?

    Just my memories from high school chemistry.

    Back to my comments about basic oils.

    I’ll put olive oil on the pasta thank you.

    Stupid simple petroleum oil of the tools.

    Bill

     

  • AndrewLeslie
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    I have noticed recently, on my tools that get a lot of friction/heat (saws, and plane bottoms), that one of the oils I was using can get a little gummy under those conditions. Not sure whether it was the Sesame Oil or the Walnut Oil, but it’s something I’ll watch for in the future. On my other tools, like Knives, Chisels, etc, I haven’t gotten any of that gumminess, so it might just come down to how well I wiped the oil off the saw blade and plane bottom.

  • Djl
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    I keep it simple

    I use mineral oil.  It is in expensive and safe to use on projects for kids or food.

  • Bruce G.
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    I use Ballistrol as a general wipe down treatment and G96 Gun Treatment (CLP) for moving parts, screws and threads.

     

    Bruce, Oklahoma

  • DennyT
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    I use a rag with 3 in 1 I keep in an old plastic butter container. Wipe down everything I use. Seems to work as I am in an unheated unsealed pole barn that leaks in one corner when it rains . Until the new tool chest is built . I keep all ” rust able ” items – chisels planes. Bevel gauges . Try squares. Etc cover up with an oiling bath towel when not in use,

     

     

  • Tomas B
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    My oil of choice has always been 3 in 1. Recently i discovered ballistol, and the stuff is amazing! For anything that may be near food, like cutting boards i go for regular CVS mineral oil (i also condition my cutting boards themselves with mineral oil).

  • MervilleHomesteader
    Participant
    Post count: 10

    Pigs lard and beeswax for my wood planes,( works good on all my leather boots too) and normally just mineral oil on my metals. I was always cautious of olive oil because I heard it can go rancid. But with so many people claiming to use with no side effects I might just give it a go. I might just make me an oil carpet like Jim Tolpin talks about his book The New Traditional Woodworker.

  • MarkEcfl
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    There are several types of oil available in the market than can remove rust from the tools easily.

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