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  • #2037093

    Red5hft
    Participant
    Post count: 23

    This past weekend I had the opportunity to attend my first antique tool show. The Potomac Antique Tools and Industries Association, based in the Washington, D.C. area, held their Annual Spring Dealer and Tool Auction in Damascus, Maryland. Seeing an opportunity to get the Corvette out for a road trip and learn more about this antique tool affliction I have come down with, I headed northwest. Joshua had recommended arriving a little after 7am to check out the tailgate sale that accompanies this event.

    What a toy chest I found! I quickly forgot about the camera hanging from my neck and my intention to take photographs. On tables, on benches, on the ground, in boxes, on tailgates, everywhere the appealing tones of rosewood, japanning, steel, rust, and nickel. Boxes of Stanley 45s, rows of Sargents and Stanleys begging for attention. Clusters of Siegleys and even a few Norris planes. Saws, rules, levels, chisels, gouges, smithy tools, even a few iron parts from Conestoga wagons left on the prairies of Pennsylvania. The list goes on. Thank goodness I was ill-prepared for the chilly morning lest I linger too long only to return home with an overloaded Vette straining under a pile of old iron and an depleted bank account.

    Finally, I headed indoor to the main event and heated space. Not knowing what to expect when I walked through the door of the Damascus Volunteer Fire Department activities center, I was immediately greeted by a shelves of Stanley planes, with the vaunted Stanley No. 1 peeking out next to its big brothers. My first “in-person” visit with the diminutive model of miniaturization. To see the No. 1 against the scale of the palm of my hand really highlighted the small scale of this creation. This little gem could be yours for a mere $1100. Not today, thank you. Imagine, back at the turn of the century, iron hand plane prices were dominated by the cost of the material use to build them. The smaller the plane, the lower the price. In 1898, the original “online” retailer, Sears, Roebuck and Co. mail order catalog sold this Stanley No. 1 plane for $0.99. That’s right, less than a dollar. That’s $30.25 in 2019 dollars.

    A large selection Tom Law’s expertly restored and sharpened antique hand saws were on display attended to by Sandra Law. It is humbling to think about owning a beautifully crafted vintage handsaw that was attended to by a legend during his lifetime. Being a Fulton Tool nut, I wondered…could there be a Fulton hand saw somewhere in this field of saws? Right in front was a list of all the saw brands on display with the saws organized alphabetically in custom cardboard boxes designed to hold the saws upright. In no time, I watched Sandra Law carefully wrap newspaper around the sharpened steel of my newly acquired Fulton hand saw. I will certainly think of Tom and his stewardship of this saw every time I put it to work on some 130 year old timbers I have for a restoration project.

    After a few laps around all the display tables looking for the elusive Fulton No. 8 size jointer plane, sadly none to be found, I took one last look over the indoor and tailgate treasures and vowed to return next year better prepared to fuel my passion for antique tools.

    “Whether you think you can, or you can’t, you’re right.”
    -Henry Ford.

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  • Joshua Farnsworth
    Keymaster
    Post count: 68

    Thanks for sharing!

  • Red5hft
    Participant
    Post count: 23

    Photos from PATINA

    I fumbled the photo uploads for the post. Here are a few pictures from the PATINA auction.

    I am guessing the wooden plane is a Sandusky center wheel plough plane (but PLEASE chime in with your thoughts). It was priced just out of my range at $12,500. My limit was $25. So close! I probably should have tried to negotiate, but I am still new at this.

    Levels

    Stanley Bailey No. 1

    Tail gate Sale

    Tail gate Sale

    “Whether you think you can, or you can’t, you’re right.”
    -Henry Ford.

  • Mike in TN
    Participant
    Post count: 293

    I love looking at tool shows and antique stores but because of the knowledge that it attracts tool fanatics and collectors, the prices tend to be beyond woodworkers who are looking for user tools. You might be able to find a relative bargain but they tend to be few and far between. I can’t blame the dealers because they have invested money, probably some time in cleaning them up, plus additional overhead and there is some advantage to woodworkers that can’t find that perfect item or don’t have time to generally go “on the hunt in the wild” for tools. I go when there is a show locally but normally come home empty handed just because of the high prices compared to what is available at flea markets, yard sales and especially estate sales. It is fun to look though and then I can chuckle to myself knowing how much I saved.

  • OldBlue
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    I have to remember this for next year. I live just over the state line in Pennsylvania. I go through Damascus to go to work, I never heard of this. I heard of others in the area but won’t be able to make it to them.
    Thanks for sharing!

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