Stanley No. 10

//Stanley No. 10
Stanley No. 10 2015-11-02T18:24:29+00:00
  • Creator
    Topic
  • #2027760

    grubbyminer
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    Anyone have a Stanley No. 10. I bought one off Ebay and have used it a few times and haven’t put it to much use. Any thoughts?

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  • Mike in TN
    Participant
    Post count: 258

    Hi grubbyminer,

    I have one and I don’t use it very much either. Since it is a standard pitch  rabbet plane, I assume you could use it anywhere you could use any other standard pitch rabbet plane, maybe touching up wide tenon faces such as in timber frame work? You could still use it as a jack plane but it probably would have more of a tendency to leave plane tracts unless you sharpened it in such a way that it would reduce the usefulness as a rabbet plane. Perhaps you could run it through the Tool Swap/Classifieds section of the forum and trade it for something more useful to you.

    Have fun.

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Trade it

     

     

    I’ll second Mike on that one.

    If you haven’t got any emotional attachments to the plane, you would maybe be better off selling/trading it. Were you looking for a particular type of plane when you bought the No 10? such a s a jack or a smoother?

    As far as I know it is not a cheap plane, so you would perhaps be able to swap it with someone.

    I actually think that I could use a No 10, since I frequently make stuff with large tenons. But my problem is that swapping with anything will require me to post it to the US, and frankly the Royal Danish Mail make Dick Turpin look like a dime store hood. = They will rip you off!

    Good luck with whatever road you take.

     

  • Mike in TN
    Participant
    Post count: 258

    Hey again,

    One other use I came across is to use it for raised panels where there is a raised center field and the width of the bevel does not exceed the width of the blade. The cross grain shoulder would still have to be knifed and I can’t imagine the the cross grain bevels would be very smooth since the blade isn’t skewed but better than not having anything I guess. A dedicated plane raising plane with a skewed blade and maybe a nicker  would be much better for that application.

    Have fun.

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