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  • Historic Design
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    Post count: 4

    Skewed hollows and rounds

    British plane makers regularly made hollows and rounds with skewed irons. Some American manufactures did also (for instance Ohio Tool Company made sets numbered 72 1/2 and 73 1/2) but they are fairly rare.  Most American joiners and cabinet makers did not use the skewed irons.  My set of user hollows and rounds was made by the English plane maker Varvill and Sons. and are skewed.

    One quick way to tell English planes is the bedding angle of the iron is usually steeper, most being a York pitch or about 50 degrees.

    Cheers.

     

  • Historic Design
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    Post count: 4

    Owner's Marks

    Maker’s marks for planes are always found on the toe of the plane rather than the heel.    Klontz is a previous owner’s name rather than the manufacturer.  These appear to be American planes and the standard reference for American woodies is A Guide to the Makers of American Wooden Planes by Emil and Martyl Pollak. Check the toe end of the plan and I imagine you will find the maker’s marks, although they aren’t always well struck and can be rather faint.

    Cheers

  • Historic Design
    Participant
    Post count: 4
    in reply to: Getting Started #2026999

    Learning blacksmithing

    Forge work and blacksmithing are quite difficult to learn from books.  I think the only way to learn is to either take classes or spend time with an accomplished blacksmith.  Otherwise you will spend lots of time getting frustrated and use up lots of steel with nothing to show for it.  Even basic things like building a proper fire can be quite difficult unless someone has shown you how to do it.  Blackmsithing is much different from woodworking in this respect as many woodworking skills can be learned much easier on one’s own.   I imagine some people will tell you otherwise, but many of the people who call themselves “blacksmiths” have very rudimentary skills.   So, take much of the advice you hear with a grain of salt.  Truly skilled blacksmith are rare.  Guys who only bend bar stock into hooks or try to make railroad spike knives are not.

    Thank being said, see if someone in your area offers classes.  That is how I started and is, I think, the best route to follow.

    MJ

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