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  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17
    in reply to: Stanley No. 10 #2027767

    Trade it

     

     

    I’ll second Mike on that one.

    If you haven’t got any emotional attachments to the plane, you would maybe be better off selling/trading it. Were you looking for a particular type of plane when you bought the No 10? such a s a jack or a smoother?

    As far as I know it is not a cheap plane, so you would perhaps be able to swap it with someone.

    I actually think that I could use a No 10, since I frequently make stuff with large tenons. But my problem is that swapping with anything will require me to post it to the US, and frankly the Royal Danish Mail make Dick Turpin look like a dime store hood. = They will rip you off!

    Good luck with whatever road you take.

     

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    It depends on what you are aiming to build.

    Hi Mike

    It is a bit hard to give an exact suggestion, because it really depends a lot on what you would like to build.

    In a way it also depends on your disability. e.g. if you have lost one arm it makes little sense to suggest you getting a hand plane that should be used using both hands, but a block plane would make perfectly sense.

     

    Making small boxes or chests can be done with relatively few tools.  If you check out Doug Stowes’ blog: wisdomofhands.blogspot.comyou can see some examples of his work.

    But to really get down to the basics, a hack saw can be used for making joinery cuts even in wood, so that is a cheap entry way to a saw.

    You will probably also need a couple of chisels, say a 1/4″ and a 3/8″ or a 1/2″.

    With those tools and the general home owners tools you can go a long way.

    Good luck and remember to have fun while pursuing this hobby.

    Brgds

    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Functional.

    Interesting question.

    I want pieces to be functional, but they should preferably look good too.

    Actually I have never made a chair, but I have made a settee and some stools. Lightness in the look is something that I strive for. But that is just a matter of personal taste.

    I have been influenced by my parents who have had a good range of different classic pieces of modern furniture at home, and the worst example of a chair in my opinion is “The egg” by Arne Jacobsen.

    That thing looks really interesting, but sitting in it is a different story, so that has directed me towards the functionality first approach.

    In my opinion there is a very fine line between boring looking and aesthetically pleasing looks. If the design is bad from from the start, it won’t help to make excessively turned ornamentation on the piece. But if the design is right from the start, a few decorations can really enhance the look by attracting the eye to specific parts of the piece.  But I would stick with a “less is more” approach. Overdoing the ornamentation often leads to a cluttered look.

    Brgds

    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Wooden jointer, 63 cm

    Hi Robert.

    I have an extra old wooden jointer which is 63 cm long.

    I have never used it. I checked the sole, and it is not dead flat. But 5 minutes on a lapping plate or a piece of glass with some sand paper is all that is required.

    There is a crack /check in the forward end of the plane. It is nothing that I would worry about. The plane being as old as it is, I don’t think it will change much anymore.

    I can’t find any manufactureres marks on it. It is made from beech, and there is an insert in the sole, just in front of the throat, of some harder wood.

    The blade is 63 mm wide (2.5″). It is 21 cm long (8″). The blade is E.A. Berg of Sweden. The chipbreaker is also E.A. Berg.

    The wedge seems to be the original one, and is in OK condition.

    I have never tampered with the plane, I actually can’t even remember when I got it.

    There is a bit of rust on the chip breaker, and a bit on the backside of the blade itsel. But The general conditon of the blade is fine. I think it is close to full length, so you can have a lot of years of planing before you need to buy a new blade.

    I can’t figure out how to make the pictures smaller, so I can’t attach a picture to this post.

    You can write me at bloksav1[at]gmail.com, then I’ll send you some pictures if you are interested.

    My idea was 40$ + postage.

    Brgds

    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Wooden jointers

    Hi Rob.

    I think that 60 cm is standard. I don’t know why, but Germans usually have a pretty good reason for whatever they are doing, and especially when it concerns standardization of something.

    I have seen older ones that are a bit longer, say maybe 70 cm, but I have never tried any of those.

    In my opinion 60 cm is really fine for a jointer. But if you want to try a longer plane I see no reason why not.

    Here is one that is 66 cm long   http://www.ebay.de/itm/alter-seltener-Hobel-Rauhbank-/400996840391?hash=item5d5d4633c7

    Here is one that is 65 cm long    http://www.ebay.de/itm/alter-seltener-Hobel-Rauhbank-/400996325333?hash=item5d5d3e57d5

    Here is another one of 66 cm length   http://www.ebay.de/itm/antiker-Hobel-Schreiner-Zimmermann-Werkzeug-Rauhbank-Langhobel-Holz-5-1cm-Klinge-/360844052435?hash=item5403fb47d3

    I’ll check when I get home (I am at work in Norway at present)

    Brgds

    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Ebay Germany

    Hi Rob

    I would check out ebay.de

    There are a lot of those wooden jointers in Denmark as well, but for some reason there is no Danish ebay site.

    In German a jointer is called a Raubank or Rauhbank, try to search using both terms.

    http://www.ebay.de/itm/ECE-Rauhbank-60mm-Raubank-Hobel-Handhobel-Holzhobel-/361392475889?hash=item5424ab8ef1

    This was one of the first I found.

    You just need to make sure the seller will ship to Canada before bidding on a tool.

    I can’t remember if I have an extra at home, but I can check once I get home on thursday.

    Brgds

    Jonas

     

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Keep it simple

    Hello Zabinsky

    My advice is to keep it simple.

    A start “kit” depends largely on the type of projects you want to make.

    Brian Eve at “toolerable” made a series of post about a beginners tool kit which he recommends: http://toolerable.blogspot.nl/p/blog-page_13.html

    I have made quite a few projects while at sea, so I have been forced to get by using a very limited tool kit. That too could work as a start kit. Here’s a link to a post that shows my travelling tool kit: http://mulesaw.blogspot.dk/2014/12/maritime-woodworking-tools.html

    I use a hack saw for dovetailing, and a cheap general purpose saw for ripping, resawing an crosscutting. If it is something small I use the Japanese saw that I bring with me.

    90% of the time I only use the 1/4″ and the 3/8″ chisels. The 1″ works as a paring chisel for me . But my projects are usually chests and things of that size.

    The thing I find really makes a change for hand tool work is a dedicated scrub plane, or a dedicated scrub iron. That will enable you to prepare stock reasonably fast. The thing my tool kit needs is a jointer plane, but due to air line travel and weight restraints, I have chosen not to bring one.

    Clamps are a thing that weighs heavy on a budget, and I think they are difficult to get by without.

    You would need some sort of sharpening medium as well.

    By keeping the kit pretty small, you are “forced” to work your way around a challenge, and that will develop you skills. If you have too many tools for a start, it is too easy to jump between tools all the time, and you might get the project done, but you spend too much time getting to know each tool and its strengths.

    Since you have a table saw, I would use that one for preparing stock. Resawing is not fun to do by hand, and then you could perhaps spend some money on buying a dovetail saw instead of a Disston.

    Best of luck

    Jonas

     

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Insulation

    I am by no means an expert in steam bending. I made a steam box pretty much like yours for a settee project last year.

    I had to bend some 5/4″ elm into two 90 degrees bends.

    The first attempts were not successful, even though I left the wood longer than the 1 hour per inch.

    I found out that the temperature of the steam box was too low. So I wrapped my drain pipe (steam box) with 100 mm of insulation mat. That really helped a lot.

    So may I suggest that you try to insulate your steam box? An effective and cheap insulation material is bubble wrap which can be found pretty cheap.

    As far as I have understood, the wood will not take any harm in being left longer than the 1 hour per inch rule of thumb. It is supposedly intended as a minimum time, and that makes sense if you have to make a living out of building e.g. a boat.

    So I would leave the wood in the steam box longer, say maybe half an hour.

    Do you have a possibility of testing with some inferior wood before going  on with the rose wood? That way you can perhaps gain some experience in placing the clamps etc.

    Good luck

    Jonas

     

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Go for flat

    Like Seth and suggests, I would also go for flat.

    My first workbench was glued up beech, and it was glued together without consideration to the grain orientation. I tried to plane it once, and it looked worse after than before.

    I would say that the trick is to make sure your plane is set to take a fine shaving, and I would start out planing diagonally.

    In old benches there are also the danger of old tacks and nails that are hidden, and they will cause a nick in your plane iron.

    If you have the possibilty to remove the top, you could check some local shop if they have a wide belt sander that it could be fed through. That might not be an “all hand tool” approach, but if it gets the job done and gives you a flat top – well then I think it is worth a try.

    Good luck with the project

    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    I like the fairly simple style like on Shaker chairs.

    I made a loop back settee last year that was my own interpretation of it.

    Brgds

    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Hi Bilbo

    I can totally understand that you had to buy it. It is such a cool piece of machinery.

    I have two young boys who are very dedicated to helping out in the shop, and I am afraid that they would somehow end up loosing a finger if I got hold of one of one of them again.

    I had a colleague on my former ship, whose brother in law made some really nice furniture out of railroad sleepers in South Africa. But apart from that, I must confess that I know absolutely nothing about your country when it comes to woodworking.

    Have fun with the guillotine (somehow that didn’t sound right).

    Brgds

    Jonas

     

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    I had a Danish model of those once, “Jyden” as far as I remember. you operated it by a pedal and then it was just a matter of keeping hands away.

    I had to get rid of it. The thing distracted me so much. Every time I was in the workshop I had to try to trim the end of a board or a small piece of wood.

    In the end I traded it for a motorized chipper/shredder for the garden.

    I did managed to produce some nice picture frames while I had it though.
    Brgds
    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Glad to be able to help.

    Depending on what type of chuck is on your brace, you might have to file some flat spots on the sides of the shank of your new screwdriver bit. If it is just plain round I am afraid that it will slip when you try to tighten a large screw with it.

    That’s why my idea was to use an old brace type drill bit. They have that conical square end that helps to ensure it doesn’t slip.

    Brgds

    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Rough cut before surfacing

    I’m with JimN on this one.

    Rough cut the pieces to length before starting to square things up.

    Assuming your legs are going to be say 22″ long, I would make a board that is 45″ long,  flatten it on both sides, crosscut to 22.5″, rip all to the correct width. plane the remaining sides.

    The final 0.5″ can be removed after assembly, when you make sure the saw bench touches the floor with all four legs.

    I made a sawbench some years ago, and it is one of the most useful projects you can make in my opinion. I think I need to make another one at some point.

    Brgds

    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    DIY bit

    Hi Nick

    I would make one myself. If you buy or find an old drill bit for a brace, it can even be one that is worn out.

    Just cut the shank to the length you want and grind/file the tip to the size you need.

    I don’t know if you’ll need to harden it, but even that shouldn’t be too hard.

    Good luck

    Brgds Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    It looks like it could be elm.

    Hi Bill.

    I think it might be elm.

    Interlocking grain is a hallmark of elm.

    Green stripes are commonly found it it as well.

    http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-identification/hardwoods/american-elm/

    http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-identification/hardwoods/wych-elm/

    I don’t know where in the World you are live, but the above links covers American elm and Wych elm (which is common in Europe).

    Brgds

    Jonas

  • Jonas Jensen
    Participant
    Post count: 17

    Hello Germanjoiner

    Hello.

    I can’t remember where I obtained the plane from, so I figured that it was better it got a new home where someone could use it :-)

    E.A. Berg blades are excellent, but they are quite common in Denmark, and especially in Sweden, where my parents have a small summer house.

    I just checked the shipping to Canada from Denmark of the plane would be approximately 70 Euro, which is too much in my opinion.

    Und in Deutsch :-)

    Ich erinnere nicht, wo ich den hobel bekommen habe. So ich habe gedacht, das es besser war, den hobel an einer neuer Besitzer zu schicken. Einer der den hobel braucht.

    Die E.A. Berg Eisen sind sehr gut, aber sie sind “normal” in Dänemark zu finden. Und besonders in Schweden, wo meine Eltern ein Sommerhaus hat.

    Die Versandkosten Dänemark – Kanada sind 70 Euro! (viel zu teuer).

    Gruss

    Jonas

     

Viewing 17 replies - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)