Forum Replies Created

Viewing 12 replies - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    Denny, sounds like you are off to a good start. I try to not obsess about my tools and just enjoy woodworking. I can afford newer high quality tools, but I often forgo them because I enjoy tuning up old tools. I have to keep reminding myself that everything is a variation on axe, saw and chisel. Tool collecting can be a separate hobby, but it is nice to have a small collection.

    My weakness is planes. I started with a Stanley 4, then Stanley 5, then a rusty Craftsman 7, followed by a Stanley 4 1/2. I have now added a Stanley 3, 78, and a 45. All are good users with a little tuning. I also have Stanley 6 that I picked up cheap, but it needs a little flattening. I have a Miller Falls 71 router plane with Veritas cutters for routing and I prefer it. None of these planes are fancy, but do a great job with a little tweaking and sharpening. My chisels are nothing fancy either and may need more frequent sharpening than high end chisels, but they still work. I also buy some things at Harbor Freight. Their Japanese pull saws and hardpoint miter saws may be disposable, but they cut well enough. (I really need to teach myself to sharpen my old saws.) Their clamps are also a good buy.

    I have a good quality makita circular saw and a second hand Sears bandsaw to help with breakdown but I do not have a table saw. I have access to one if I need it, but try to avoid it. I picked up a miter box and saw for $10 that works great, although I will need to sharpen it.

    I found a used Delta tabletop drill press for $40 and it comes in handy. I also use brace and eggbeater drill. A brace can make a great cordless screwdriver.

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    refinishing planes

    My planes are not expensive collectibles. I just use them. IF the japanning is really bad I just clean them up an respray with Black Epoxy Suspension paint. Once it cures it makes a nice looking durable finish.

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    Plane restoration

    Since it has no distinguishing marks, the only clues are the parts themselves. Department chains often commissioned planes from stanley, sargent or miller falls. That rear tote looks like some miller falls planes I have seen, but who knows?

    It is up to you how much work you want to put into bringing it up to working condition. Some will say it isn’t worth fixing, others would restore it to mint.  I personally like the challenge of giving old tools a shot at a second life. Some become everyday users and some become paperweights and some are in between. If the sole is relatively flat it might be worth fixing up to see how well it works. I was given sargent hercules no 5 plane. I probably would not have bought it myself. I decided to clean it up and found that despite its light weight it was a passable jack plane.

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13
    in reply to: Nikk's Shop #2027116

    Nice space! Thanks for the tour!

    I would like to have a dedicated room like that I go back and forth between bedroom and garage depending on the weather. I have a dutch tool chest and a small  nicholson bench (naked woodworker).

    I am beginning to amass a small collection of old planes. I enjoy fixing them and using them!

    rick

     

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    That is some nice looking Douglas Fir! That will make a beautiful bench.

     

    I am jealous!:)

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13
    in reply to: References? #2026991

    “The Old Ways Of Working Wood” by Alex Bealer is a good book, too. I found mine in the bargain books.

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13
    in reply to: Stanley 45 ? #2026990

    That looks just like my so-so condition Stanley 45 except yours is complete! That is a great find!

    I have seen a Sargent combination plane and it does not look anything like the Stanley. The mail order companies usually contracted for their tools from either Sargent, Stanley, or Miller Falls.

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13
  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    I have one that I need to do, too. I haven’t started yet, but I did a little research.

    This might help:

    http://eatoncountywoodworker.blogspot.com/2015/01/18th-century-chisel-handles.html

    http://www.workbenchdiary.com/2015/01/dillingers-got-it-handled.html

    The key appears to be stepped drilling and careful alignment. Good luck!

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13
    in reply to: References? #2026945

    Mike Abbott

    Check out “Going with the Grain” by Mike Abbott. That should get you started.

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    Give them away

    I give shavings to relatives with wood stoves. They wrap some in newspaper and use them for starting fires. We also have trails in our woods. I save shavings and my cousin spreads them on the trails.

  • rickg3
    Participant
    Post count: 13
    in reply to: Trestle Table #2033117

    I think it took about a week. The breadboard ends took me a couple of days. All the wood, except the oak tusks, was rough white pine. The planing took the most time followed by the mortising.

Viewing 12 replies - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)