Traditional Woodworking Tour: 1820s Tool Chest at the Frontier Culture Museum

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This above video is a continuation of my amazing recent visit, with my family, to the Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton, Virginia. Click here to see the previous video and photos.

rontier Culture Museum 1820's farm tool chest

Steven Gallagher took time to give me a tour of his mid-19th Century tool chest. I love old tools, so this was like Christmas for me!

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

We also had a really great time talking about handle making. I was surprised to see that he uses the same method for securing his froe handle that I do…I thought I had invented it (see my previous video to see what I’m talking about).

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

 

Steven also introduced me to the furniture of George Lott. George is an incredible period furniture maker who studies and re-creates much of the furniture on the different Frontier Culture Museum farms (keep watching my videos…I setup a future meeting with George Lott to see his workshop).  Here are some of the details of his (and maybe others’) breathtaking historic furniture from this building (much more to come from the other farmhouses):

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

 

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

Of course, my two little boys knew exactly what these foot-powered vice benches were called: “shaving horses!”

 

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

 

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

 

I believe this hay rake was actually inspired by one built by Roy Underhill (The Woodwright’s Shop):

 

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

©  Joshua T. Farnsworth

I’ll be sharing a series of these workshops & tool chests, so make sure you subscribe to have my future articles delivered to your inbox.

About the Frontier Culture Museum

The Frontier Culture Museum is  unlike anything I’ve encountered. The organization has disassembled actual period farms from England, Ireland, Germany, Africa, and different parts of the United States, then reconstructed them on several hundred acres of lush Virginia farmland. Why? To educate Americans on how our American farms were influenced by immigrants from overseas. You can see the different farms here.

What I found particularly fascinating was the woodworking tools and furniture displayed at each of the 10 farms. The staff actually use the respective tools to construct furniture and tools. It is a hands on “museum” so I just helped myself to all the amazing tool chests! The staff didn’t mind. They also didn’t mind that I constantly caressed their reproduction furniture either…although I got some strange looks.

2017-04-20T09:59:39+00:00

About the Author:

"I'm wildly passionate about traditional woodworking with hand tools, and want to rekindle this lost art. At WoodAndShop I teach you the skills that I learn, and also share anything fascinating that I discover about traditional woodworking. That includes tours of traditional workshops, beautiful furniture, and my favorite tools and books. I hope you enjoy my videos, photos, and articles. Please feel free to leave constructive comments!"

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