Introduction to Joinery

//Introduction to Joinery
Introduction to Joinery 2015-07-02T12:31:01+00:00
  • Creator
    Topic
  • #1992883

    Seth Ruffin
    Participant
    Post count: 62

    I learned a lot about joinery from some trial and error attempts. I still don’t think I fully understand all joinery and their applications. One thing I learned from my trial and error work on my coffee table was that there are three types of joining; end to end, end to side, and side to side. Let me know if I missed any?

    I also learned that certain joints are appropriate for certain applications. End to end joints include finger and dovetail joints, end to side joints include mortice and tenon or sliding dovetail joints, and side to side joints include tongue and groove and ship lap joints.

    I had scoured the internet and places that normally I can find information but I was never able to find this information until I had to discover it just from my experiments.

    I know more information has to be out there on joints and their appropriate application. Does anyone have some sources that they return to when deciding what type to joint to use when? I’m hoping to find a resource that teaches more about traditional application for each joint type.

    Thanks for any help.

  • Author
    Replies
  • Flatboarder1
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Excellent question

    Hello Seth, that is an excellent topic and question. You certainly aroused my thoughts on the subject. I have never really thought of it that way but I think I remember reading something in one of my books now that you have mention it. I’ll see if I can find it today and get back to you.

    It most definitely simplifies the subject concerning joinery . Since there are so many different types of joints it gets confusing after a while, so confusing that it’s overwhelms me to the point to where I get affixed on just two are three types and rarely try anything new. I’ll let you know what I find out and thanks for the post.  Chris

  • Seth Ruffin
    Participant
    Post count: 62

    Thanks Chris if you find a book or source please share it. Any help or advice is appriciated. Though I do feel there must be some simplicity to the selection of a joint that simply alludes a new woodworker like me. Like I said I have a feel it has to do with how the boards are being joined (i.e. end to end) and strength needed (i.e. Glued miter vs finger joint vs dovetail). I suppose aesthetics likely plays a role as well.

  • Flatboarder1
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Different types of Joints

    Hello Seth, Here you go try this out for some woodworking food.

    Methods Of Joining wood together can be classified under four Broad Headings.

    1) Butted Joints, either edge to edge ,side to side, and with or without additional reinforcement.

    2) Interlocking joints where is one piece of wood is cut or shaped to fit a corresponding socket in the other piece.

    3) Mechanical joints which permit controlled movement.

    4) Knock-down metal or plastic fittings which secure the various wood sections together to form rigid structures.

    Encyclopedia Of Furniture Making by Ernest Joyce

    Chapter 14 page 150.

    chris

  • Seth Ruffin
    Participant
    Post count: 62

    Intersting distinctions and descriptions of joints as well. Is that the extent of discussion of joinery in the book or is there more? Just contemplating if the book is worth purchasing for its information on this topic.

    Seth

    • Flatboarder1
      Participant
      Post count: 4

      Cats Meow

      Seth, Thats the Cats Meow Of all woodworking books. When I first started woodworking I was told from a very very influential Cabinet Maker from the UK to buy that book. So I did . Seth I have 100’s of books, DVD’s, Streamlines ect. I cant begin to suggest which one would be the best read for you because it all depends. But that book you wouldnt go wrong on period.  Planecraft is another good useful book If you like using Handplanes. I do. I try to buy at least one book a month. If your trying to teach your self the trade in my opinion thats the way. You just have to be careful and try not to adapt every woodworkers way of doing things Like Sharpening for example. You need to find what works for you and then stick with it. If not you will get so screwed up you want be able to sharpen a pencil. After eight years I thought I knew how to sharpen and the recently I found myself in big trouble and to top it all off I thought that my problem with Hand Planing was lack of Technic . It turned out that is was just my  sharpening. It was that simple. Once I got that straighten out I was able to square edges, Flatten tops, Dimension wood and throw away my sand paper  Oops . I wouldn’t recommend throwing away your sandpaper though, lol  there will be some wood that you just cant Plane not for a finished result.  Anyway hope this will help you some It did me. Cheers

      Chris

  • Seth Ruffin
    Participant
    Post count: 62

    Well Chris, I’m sold I’m looking it up now to try to find it. Thanks for the book suggestion.

    Seth

  • manifolded
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    If you want something that’s small and somewhat brief, The joint book is pretty cool.

  • mshacklady
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Don’t forget your local library. Mine has lots of good books (including the ones mentioned above) that are free to borrow. My library has online searching, and I can place hold requests so the books are ready to pick up when I arrive and I don’t have to go searching. The other great thing is that they have the latest copy of Fine Woodworking on the magazine shelves so I get to enjoy that for free as well!

    Otherwise it could turn into an even MORE expensive hobby :)

  • blmwoodworks
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Have you tried searching on Paul Sellers

    I have seen a number of Paul Sellers youtube videos and I know he has a good one on types of Joinery.

  • Flatboarder1
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Masterclass

    try Paul Sellers WoodworkingMasterclasses

    and look at all videos plus more,

    Paul is an awesome craftsman.

    I’ve been a member now for two years. He makes things look easy , I make the same task look difficult, lol but most of all Paul is a good teacher.

    It’s one thing to be able to do something it’s another thing to be able to teach.

    I would pay 1000 times more than the fee for the Masterclass site just for him to teach me ,

    but I’m disabled and can’t travel so Im stuck trying to learn on my own . Paul is one of the few that’s willing to pass on his knoweldge to everyone and not just the ones with deep pockets, believe me cause I’ve tried to get help. But I also understand one person can only do so much , I think that’s why Paul decided to use  the Internet . This way he can reach millions if there interested and for what, fifteen dollar a month, wow who else is willing to do this? That says a lot about a person.

  • SamGordon
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Paul Sellers

    Hi Seth
    Like some of the people above I think Paul Sellers is a great resource. In particular the video about 3 woodworking joints: Mortise and tenon, dovetails and rabbets. That being said if you are like me learning from sources that don’t involve direct human to human teaching I suggest finding the best teacher for a given topic. Such as Frank Klausz for dovetails for example. I teach martial arts and fitness and I know I would not learn to box from a wrestler for instance. Good luck Seth.

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