Kerfing Plane

//Kerfing Plane
Kerfing Plane 2015-12-14T21:23:25+00:00

Tagged: 

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #2028148

    James Wright
    Participant
    Post count: 108

    Has anyone on here ever made one? I was thinking of making one out of a 12″ back saw that is missing the back. What are your thoughts and or experience?

  • Author
    Replies
  • Mike in TN
    Participant
    Post count: 264

    Hi Janes,

    This is one that I had to go look up. Even my plane reference books didn’t list it but I finally found some information online. Apparently they have some use for creating a kerf specifically to help guide a saw for re=sawing and could see some function for establishing an easy to see line for thickness planning and for establishing a lip for raised panels, drawer bottoms, etc. If it was set up right I could see it also being used in place of a stair saw.There is a video  online about a kerf plane build but if I was going to build one I would put an adjustable fence on the bottom like you find on a adjustable fence grooving plane, and would slot the saw blade so you can adjust the sawing depth like a stair saw. The possible drawback for re-sawing would be that resulting kerf would need to be close to that of the saw actually used for the re-sawing. It sounds like an excellent project and I hope you will post some photos of it. I may just build one myself.

    Have fun.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAAtVRCTQIA

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    • Mike in TN
      Participant
      Post count: 264

      I have finally finished my version of the “kerfing plane” which I really see as a kerfing saw. While this type of tool is generally touted for kerfing for resawing I also saw a lot of potential for creating general rabbets, reducing edges of panels for drawer bottoms and raised panels. establishing edges of grooves in the absence of grooving and plow (plough) planes and similar operations.

      The blade came from an old saw plate that I cut and re-toothed for a 10 TPI rip configuration since most of the work I envision for the tool will be along the grain. I chose a simplified adjustable fence loosely based on one from a grooving plane that I have and it provides me with up to 1 1/2 of distance between the blade and the fence which is plenty for most of the work I do. The fence is easily removable so that the tool can be used against a batten if additional capacity becomes necessary. I used some ambrosia maple in the tool body since I just happened to have some scraps of it that meet the need.

      They both work wonderfully and I want to thank Tom Fidgen and James Wright for the inspiration.

      Have fun.P1040973
      P1040974
      P1040971
      P1040972
      P1040924
      P1040897

  • James Wright
    Participant
    Post count: 108

    That video is what made me think about it. I have a project coming up with a lot of Re-sawing and thought this would be a fun project. I will deffenently post pictures and video if I do.

  • Sides
    Participant
    Post count: 52

    Hi James,

    After making a kerf plane you will need a frame saw. Tom Fidgen has worked with Bad Axe Tool Works to help people make these two tools. The blades have the same set to them, and come with all the hardware. It’s a little pricey, but from Bad Axe well worth the price. I am saving my pennies for this now.

     

    Bad Axe

  • James Wright
    Participant
    Post count: 108

    Here is a video of my first attempt. I am more or less reinventing the wheel here but I found it a great learning experience. I will be making another one soon with an adjustable fence and a few other extras.

    <span style=”color: #595a5d; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;”><span style=”font-size: 13px; line-height: 17px;”>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzmOtQDwQ_Y</span></span&gt;

  • Mike in TN
    Participant
    Post count: 264

    Great video James and I will definitely check out the other videos you have posted on Youtube. I have started my own version of a “kerfing plane” and will post some photos when I get them finished. I am afraid the holidays and family pressures have reduced my shop time but I should be able to finish up and post within the next few days.

    Have fun

  • James Wright
    Participant
    Post count: 108

    I love the fence idea. How did you slot the blade to make that ajustable?

    • Mike in TN
      Participant
      Post count: 264

      I have to admit that not all of the work on the saws was done with hand tools. I drilled holes in the saw plate and finished up the slots with a rotary tool and a cutting wheel and files. I have been checking out your videos this morning. Keep up the good work.

      Have fun

      • Mike in TN
        Participant
        Post count: 264

        A alternative method for cutting the slots in the blade would have been to sandwich the blade in thin wood and cut it with a hacksaw. You would have to be careful with the layout lines. I did worry about the thickness of the fence support and the use of bolts and wingnuts to secure the fence but so far everything seems strong enough. If I do have end up using thicker wood for a fence support it is an easy fix.

        Have fun

  • James Wright
    Participant
    Post count: 108

    I was thinking rather than making two pieces for the fence support (one going vertical and one going horizontal) I would just make one piece approximately 2 inches by 2 inches and have the bolts stick through all the way.

    • Mike in TN
      Participant
      Post count: 264

      I considered doing that originally but I was trying to keep the overall weight down and I wanted a thicker fence so I could still use it with a more extended blade.  So far the compromise seems to have worked.

      Have fun.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Log In
Join

Wood and Shop in your inbox?

Subscribe to get Joshua's free traditional woodworking videos, articles & news:

You have Successfully Subscribed!