Waterproof joinery

//Waterproof joinery
Waterproof joinery 2016-05-23T05:55:52+00:00
  • Creator
    Topic
  • #2028870

    Paana
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Hi all. This is my first post on this forum. Sorry about the bad English.

    A few week ago I saw a YouTube-video. I dont remember the topic (waterstones, or something simular?) but  in the video he showed how you could easy make a square box waterproof by joinery.

    The key was to take a nail and hammering it along the fibers in the wood so that a hollow was made. The second step was to plane down the area around the hollow to the same deep as the bottom of the hollow. When that area later was being hit by water it made the joinery for the box waterproof.

    But I cant remember the joinery he used for the box/container! So my question to you all are: What joinery do you think he used so it benefit from the “hammering down a nail” and become waterproof?

    I have added two pictures: one about the technique itself and one of what i can remember from the box/container.

    Please help this newbie that isnt used to thinking about different joinerys.

    /Paana

  • Author
    Replies
  • Mike in TN
    Participant
    Post count: 262

    Hi Panna,

    I am almost certain that the video you mentioned is by Frank Klausz (one of my favorites) but it has been a long time since I watched it. Without watching it again, I don’t remember for a fact what method was used at the box corners but I seem to think that very dry soft wood was used with tight dados or sliding dovetails and the side pieces were allowed to run long past the joints. The sides and ends were planed flat on the bottom edge after assembly to help ensure a tight seal with the bottom before the groove was established by compression using a bent nail or wire and a hammer. Then the box was planned down again (just to the bottom of the compression groove). The flattened bottom was nailed on very tightly. When the water hits the wood the wood swells with the compressed groove swelling more than the surrounding area. The swelled, previously compressed wood, forms a gasket.

    Have fun.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Log In
Join

Wood and Shop in your inbox?

Subscribe to get Joshua's free traditional woodworking videos, articles & news:

You have Successfully Subscribed!